Thursday, May 28, 2009

The Moon Inside (Gets Round and Round)

To pick up briefly on The Wife's 'shipwrecked and comatose' theme of a few days ago, I ran across this trailer for Duncan Jones's Moon.

It looks...quite good.



The references to classics like 2001, Solaris or Silent Running are obvious, but I don't mind an homage if it's done well.

Coincidentally, I also -- while looking for something else -- happened across this interview with Jones in Popular Mechanics (via) which not only explains how to make lunar concrete but also references Daniel Dennett. It concludes intriguingly:

What's up next for you?
It looks like I'm going to be doing another science-fiction film next. I love Blade Runner, it's one of my favorite films, and I've always been really… depressed that there was never—not a sequel, because I don't think it's right to make a sequel about Blade Runner, but no one's really tried to make a film which was set in the same kind of world or had that same kind of field. So that's what I'm doing, a big-city mystery story that takes place in a future Berlin.

Since being in Berlin already, I find somehow, makes one feel as if one is living slightly in the future, I'm curious about what Mr. Jones comes up with.


(Post title reference)

4 comments:

The Wife said...

Actually, I think it was this trailer that made me think of Red Dwarf.

J. Carter Wood said...

Ah, that'd be better, perhaps. The journey from horror to comedy is easier (or at least less depressing) than the other way around...

Geoff Coupe said...

Ooh - looks interesting. But, while it's clearly trying to jiggle the funny bone, it shouts American humor to me, rather than British Humour (aka Red Dwarf).

I prefer the humour of RD (that's both Red Dwarf and Richard Dawkins) to the US equivalent, but that's probably because of my cultural conditioning.

In any event, I'll be prepared to give the Moon Inside a shot...

J. Carter Wood said...

Oh, I found it tickling more my horror bone than any other, though some dark humour certainly sneaks through.

But, yes, if for no other reason than its humour (or at least a certain strain of it) Britain sometimes reminds us why we should not be appalled that it goes on existing....

Even after decades in America, my mother, who was English, struggled with American humour: 'I never understood Bob Hope', she often said.